Lochs around Perthshire

Loch Faskally - Pitlochry

Loch Faskally - Pitlochry

Loch Faskally lies between steeply wooded hills and is approximately 3.2 kilometres in length, narrowing to around 700 metres wide. The loch is retained by the Pitlochry Dam which was buil between 1947 and 1950 as part of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board' Hydro Electric Scheme. The dam incorporates the salmon fish ladder, allowing around 5,400 salmon to ascend annually, and is a popular visitor attraction.

 
Loch Tummel

Loch Tummel

Loch Tummel is approximately 11 kilometres long from east to west, and is just under 1 kilometre wide. It became part of the Tummel Hydro-Electric Power Scheme when the Clunie Dam was constructed by Wimpey Construction at its eastern end in 1950, raising the water level by 4.5 metres. The loch is traversed by roads on both north and south banks, offering splendid views of the surrounding countryside. 

 
Loch Rannoch

Loch Rannoch

Loch Rannoch is over 14 kilometres long in an east-west direction with an average width of about 1,000 m. The River Tummel begins at its eastern end. The Tay Forest Park lies along its southern shore. The wild Rannoch Moor extends to the west of the loch and used to be part of the Caledonian Forest that stretched across much of Northern Scotland. This is proven in part by the presence of Scots Pine stumps preserved in the boggy areas of the moor.

 
Loch Tay

Loch Tay

Loch Tay is 23 kilometres long and at its widest is more than a 2 kilometres across. It runs from the south west (Killin) to the north east ( Kenmore ) and is flanked on either side by mountains. These include the Munros of Ben Lawers and Meall Greigh. On the north side is the main A827 road which also links Killin and Kenmore and is an important east-west corridor. On the south shore is a single track road which, although it takes longer, offers some fine views Loch Tay is renowned for its water sports, including River and Loch Tay salmon fishing, canoeing, paragliding, rafting and yachting.

 
Fishing in Perthshire

Fishing in Perthshire

Tayside (which consists of the counties of Perthshire and Angus) offers some of the most extensive fishing opportunities in the country. It is estimated that there are over 6,000 miles of rivers lochs and streams in the region and many more miles of coastline. The area is a paradise for game, coarse and sea anglers alike.

 
Butterstone Loch Fishings

Butterstone Loch Fishings

If your looking for the wonder of Scottish trout fishing then look no further as Butterstone Loch is one of Scotland's Premier trout fishing lochs specialising in quality Scottish Rainbow, Brown and Blue trout. Set in the heart of Scottish fly fishing country Perthshire, close to Dunkeld and the river Tay.

 
Mountain Biking - The Jacobite Trail

Mountain Biking - The Jacobite Trail

Head north through the Trossachs and Rob Roy country into Perthshire, Scotland's most beautiful county. This route winds its way round the numerous lochs tracing the old cattle drove roads past the majestic mountain of Schiehallion. Pick up the natural lines taken by General Wade for a spectacular descent into the Great Glen before heading north by Loch Ness on the Jacobite route to finish at Inverness Castle.

 



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